Adel Shaban Sadik, Ph.D

Assistant Professor

Al Ain Campus

+971 3 7024857

adel.sadeq@aau.ac.ae

Education

Ph.D. in Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Queen’s University Belfast, UK

MSc. in Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Queen’s University Belfast, UK

BSc. in Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al Mansur University, Egypt

Research Interests

Evidence-based pharmaceutical care researches involving optimization of drugs treatment, intensive education and self-monitoring of patients with cardiac diseases on a range of clinical and humanistic outcome measures.

Selected Publications

  • Aburuz S, Al-Bekairy A, Alqahtani A, Sadeq A, Comparison of the Application of the Adult Treatment Panel III and the ACC/AHA Guidelines for Blood Cholesterol Treatment in Saudi Arabia, Journal of the Saudi Heart Association (2018)

  • Eissa N, Al-Houqani M, Sadeq A,Current Enlightenment About Etiology and Pharmacological Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder, Frontiers in Neuroscience (2018)

  • A. Shehab, A. Elnour, A. Sadik, M. AbuMandil, A Al Suwaidi, Dabigatran: A Pharmacovigilance Study in Al Ain hospital, UAE. Submitted, Saudi Medical Journal. April 2015.
  • A. Shehab, A. Elnour, S. Al Nuaimi, F. Hamad, A. Sadek, Novel Oral Anticoagulants and the 73rd Anniversary of Historical Warfarin. Journal of Saudi Heart Association, May, 2015. 
  • Koshman SL, Charrois TL, Simpson SH, A. Sadik, Pharmacist care of patients with heart failure. A systematic review of randomized trials, Archives of Internal Medicine, April, 2008.
  • A. SadikHughes CM & J. C. McElnay, Pharmaceutical Care of Patients with Congestive Heart Failure, Br J Clin Pharm, November 2005. (Google, Yahoo).
  • A. Sadik, M. Yousif & J. C. McElnay, Pharmaceutical Care for Elderly Patients with CHF. Nottingham, UK, 19-20 April 2001. (Google, Yahoo).

Teaching Courses

Clinical Pharmacy, Pharmacotherapy, Non Prescription, Pharmacoepidemiology, Patient Assessment, Pharmacy Practice, Clinical Laboratory Tests and Pathophysiolgy

Memberships

  • Pharmacy Manager, Al Ain Hospital, 1997 up to 2009, UAE.
  • Consultant Clinical Pharmacist, Head Section, Al Ain Hospital, up to 2009, UAE.
  • Member of HAAD Clinical Pharmacy Licensing Exam, Abu Dhabi, up to date.
  • Member of HAAD Pharmacy Licensing Exam Panel, License Section, Abu Dhabi, up to date.
  • Member of HAAD Pharmacy Licensing Examination Advisory Committee, up to date.
  • Member of  Faculty positions Selection in Clinical Pharmacology, FMHS, UAE University, 2009.
  • Member of Pharmacy Employment Interview Committee, Al Ain hospital, up to 2015.
  • Member of Federal Pharmaceutical and Therapeutic Committee, MOH & HAAD, up 2015.
  • Chairman of Medication Safety Committee, Al Ain Medical District, HAAD, 2008.
  • Member of the Scientific Committee of Duphat Conference, 2004, Dubai.

Article Full-text Available

Comparison of the application of treatment Panel III and American Heart Association guidelines for blood cholesterol treatment in Saudi Arabia.

Published in: J Saudi Heart Associa.

Oct 30, 2018

Aburuz S Al-Bekairy A Alquhtani AA Harbi K Al Nuhaiot M Khoja A SadeqA Al Rashed M.

Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental brain disorder characterized by two core behavioral symptoms, namely impairments in social communication and restricted/repetitive behavior. The molecular mechanisms underlying ASD are not well understood. Recent genetic as well as non-genetic animal models contributed significantly in understanding the pathophysiology of ASD, as they establish autism-like behavior in mice and rats. Among the genetic causes, several chromosomal mutations including duplications or deletions could be possible causative factors of ASD. In addition, the biochemical basis suggests that several brain neurotransmitters, e.g., dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), acetylcholine (ACh), glutamate (Glu) and histamine (HA) participate in the onset and progression of ASD. Despite of convincible understanding, risperidone and aripiprazole are the only two drugs available clinically for improving behavioral symptoms of ASD following approval by Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Till date, up to our knowledge there is no other drug approved for clinical usage specifically for ASD symptoms. However, many novel drug candidates and classes of compounds are underway for ASD at different phases of preclinical and clinical drug development. In this review, the diversity of numerous aetiological factors and the alterations in variety of neurotransmitter generation, release and function linked to ASD are discussed with focus on drugs currently used to manage neuropsychiatric symptoms related to ASD. The review also highlights the clinical development of drugs with emphasis on their pharmacological targets aiming at improving core symptoms in ASD.


Article Full-text Available

Current Enlightenment About Etiology and Pharmacological Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder

Published in: Frontiers in neuroscience

May 16, 2018

Nermin Eissa Mohammed Al-Houqani Adel Sadeq Shreesh K. Ojha Astrid Sasse

Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental brain disorder characterized by two core behavioral symptoms, namely impairments in social communication and restricted/repetitive behavior. The molecular mechanisms underlying ASD are not well understood. Recent genetic as well as non-genetic animal models contributed significantly in understanding the pathophysiology of ASD, as they establish autism-like behavior in mice and rats. Among the genetic causes, several chromosomal mutations including duplications or deletions could be possible causative factors of ASD. In addition, the biochemical basis suggests that several brain neurotransmitters, e.g., dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), acetylcholine (ACh), glutamate (Glu) and histamine (HA) participate in the onset and progression of ASD. Despite of convincible understanding, risperidone and aripiprazole are the only two drugs available clinically for improving behavioral symptoms of ASD following approval by Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Till date, up to our knowledge there is no other drug approved for clinical usage specifically for ASD symptoms. However, many novel drug candidates and classes of compounds are underway for ASD at different phases of preclinical and clinical drug development. In this review, the diversity of numerous aetiological factors and the alterations in variety of neurotransmitter generation, release and function linked to ASD are discussed with focus on drugs currently used to manage neuropsychiatric symptoms related to ASD. The review also highlights the clinical development of drugs with emphasis on their pharmacological targets aiming at improving core symptoms in ASD.


Article

Histamine H3 receptor as a potential target for cognitive symptoms in neuropsychiatric diseases

Published in: Elsevier

Oct 01, 2016

Bassem Sadek Ali Saad Adel Sadeq Fakhreya Jalal Holger Stark

The potential contributions of the brain histaminergic system in neurodegenerative diseases, and the possiblity of histamine-targeting treatments is attracting considerable interests. The histamine H3 receptor (H3R) is expressed mainly in the central nervous system, and is, consequently, an attractive pharmacological target. Although recently described clinical trials have been disappointing in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and schizophrenia (SCH), numerous H3R antagonists, including pitolisant, demonstrate potential in the treatment of narcolepsy, excessive daytime sleepiness associated with cognitive impairment, epilepsy, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review focuses on the recent preclinical as well as clinical results that support the relevance of H3R antagonists for the treatment of cognitive symptoms in neuropsychiatric diseases, namely AD, epilepsy and SCH. The review summarizes the role of histaminergic neurotransmission with focus on these brain disorders, as well as the effects of numerous H3R antagonists on animal models and humans.


Article Full-text Available

Novel oral anticoagulants and the 73rd anniversary of historical warfarin

Published in: Journal of the Saudi Heart Association

Jan 01, 2016

Abdulla Shehab a

‘The can of un-coagulated blood lying on the floor of Link’s laboratory was to change the course of history, and little did Link know what the long-term implications would be’’[1]. In 1941, the Wisconsin Alumni Research Fund (WARF) scientist Karl Paul Link and his senior student Wilhelm Schoeffel could never have imagined that their research would live longer than 73 years. Link named the substance after the organization that supported his research and the name warfarin was created (Fig. 1). In the 1950s, warfarin was used as an anticoagulant for victims of heart attacks and strokes. It gained fame when it was used to treat President Dwight D. Eisenhower after his 1955 coronary event while in office [1]. The historical narrative of warfarin starts with a mysterious hemorrhagic disease (sweet clover disease) of cattle to the development of a rat poison (rodenticide), which later became one of the most commonly


Article

Clinical utility of dabigatran in United Arab Emirates: A pharmacovigilance study

Published in: Saudi Medical Journal

Nov 01, 2015

Abdulla Shehab FRCP PhD Asim A. Elnour MSc Adel Sadik Mahmoud Abu Mandil Ali AlShamsi MD Aesha Al Suwaidi AkshayaSrikanth Bhagavathula Pharm D Pinar Erkekoglu Farah Hamad and Saif K. Al Nuaimi

Objectives: To provide early data regarding clinical utility of dabigatran in Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods: This was an ethics approved retrospective cross sectional study. We retrieved a total of 76 patients who were using dabigatran from September to December 2014 in the Cardiology Clinic at Al-Ain Hospital, Al-Ain, UAE. The primary analysis was designed to test the frequency of bleeding events (rate) with dabigatran 75, 110, and 150 mg. Results: The mean age ± standard deviation of cohort was 67.9 ± 1.5 years (range; 29-98 years), composed of males (52.6%) with mean age of 66.3 ± 1.7 years, and females (47.4%) with mean age of 69.6 ± 1.1 years. The highest age group was those between 61-80 years (60.5%). Most comprised the age strata of ≤75 years (73.7%). The main indication for dabigatran use was atrial fibrillation. The rate of bleeding with dabigatran was 18/76 (23.7%), and melena was the leading cause of bleeding 8/76 (10.7%). The hospitalization rate was 67.1%, dabigatran withdrawal rate was 0.01%, and mortality rate was 6.5%. The cohort had exhibited incidences of minor bleeding with one fatal major bleeding, high co-morbidities, admission, and readmission, which was not directly linked to dabigatran. We did not identify any relation of death due to dabigatran. Conclusion: Dabigatran is a suitable alternative to warfarin obviating the need for repetitive international normalized ratio monitoring, however, it may need plasma drug monitoring.


Article Full-text Available

Pharmaceutical care of patients with heart failure

Published in: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

Aug 01, 2005

J C McElnay A Sadik M Yousif

Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a pharmacist-led pharmaceutical care programme, involving optimization of drug treatment and intensive education and self-monitoring of patients with heart failure (HF) within the United Arab Emirates (UAE), on a range of clinical and humanistic outcome measures. Methods The study was a randomized, controlled, longitudinal, prospective clinical trial at Al-Ain Hospital, Al-Ain, UAE. Patients were recruited from the general medical wards and from cardiology and medical outpatient clinics. HF patients who fulfilled the entrance criteria, and had no exclusion criteria present, were identified for inclusion in the study. After recruitment, patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: intervention group or control group. Intervention patients received a structured pharmaceutical care service while control patients received traditional services. Patient follow-up took place when patients attended scheduled outpatient clinics (every 3 months). A total of 104 patients in each group completed the trial (12 months). The patients were generally suffering from mild to moderate HF (NYHA Class 1, 29.5%; Class 2, 50.5%; Class 3, 16%; and Class 4, 4%). Results Over the study period, intervention patients showed significant (P < 0.05) improvements in a range of summary outcome measures [AUC (95% confidence limits)] including exercise tolerance [2-min walk test: 1607.2 (1474.9, 1739.5) m·month in intervention patients vs. 1403.3 (1256.5, 1549.8) in control patients], forced vital capacity [31.6 (30.8, 32.4) l·month in the intervention patients vs. 27.8 (26.8, 28.9) in control patients], health-related quality of life, as measured by the Minnesota living with heart failure questionnaire [463.5 (433.2, 493.9) unit·month in intervention patients vs. 637.5 (597.2, 677.7) in control patients; a lower score in this measure indicates better health-related quality of life]. The number of individual patients who reported adherence to prescribed medications was higher (P < 0.05) in the intervention group (85 vs. 35), as was adherence to lifestyle advice (75 vs. 29) at the final assessment (12 months). There was a tendency to have a higher incidence of casualty department visits by intervention patients, but a lower rate of hospitalization. Conclusions The research provides clear evidence that the delivery of pharmaceutical care to patients with HF can lead to significant clinical and humanistic benefits. Keywords: Heart Failure, clinical pharmacy, pharmaceutical care, health outcomes, RCT